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Memorial Day inevitably provides a reminder for me of the journey that my friend Joe Galloway has been on conducting interviews over the past six years across the country with veterans of the Vietnam War to preserve their memories as part of the 50th Anniversary Vietnam War Commemoration. His interviews have been the soul of the 50th Commemorative that was launched seven years ago this Memorial Day to honor those who fought in Vietnam but were never thanked when they returned to a divided nation.

Joe Galloway Galloway, one of the best-known correspondents of that war as a reporter for United Press International, was selected by the Defense Department unit charged with administering the program to do the interviews to preserve for future generations. This column was to be an update of Galloway's interview travels as he gets back on the road, after two spinal surgeries In February, off June 9 for Florida with July in upstate New York, then in August to Louisville to do a week of interviews at 1st Marine Division Association. Then I learned of a coming reunion for a different war, the Korean conflict, whose returning veterans were celebrated for their contributions to the nation rather than reviled.

So I decided to make this column a two-part Memorial Day week offering, part on the correspondent collecting the stories of Vietnam veterans and part on one soldier's story as one of the Chosin Few, survivors of a battle that was the subject of a movie that was featured on PBS a couple of weeks ago. Michael Kavanaugh's walker sports the decal declaring "Chosin Few" and he talked about it a bit at a Memorial Day event at The Bellettini retirement community in Bellevue where he lives. Kavanaugh, who grew up in Omaha, fell in love with the idea of being a U.

Marine as an early teenager and became a Marine reservist at 16 and after boot camp was ased to train recruits in rifle proficiency. But as the Korean War broke out in June of , and United Nations forces marched deep into North Korea, Kavanaugh, then 19, soon found himself and his 1st Marine Division as part of X Corps advancing in a way that had the high command and Gen. Kavanaugh was hit in the leg at the front by a piece of shrapnel, a development that likely saved his life.

When he got out of the Army MASH unit hospital and visited the army commissary he was asked "Do you want a cold weather cap? How about a jacket? How about cold weather trousers? The commander turned out to be Chesty Puller, who was to become the most decorated U. Marine in history. We've finally found him. We're surrounded. That simplifies things. It was a brutal day battle in temperatures that plummeted to 35 to 40 degrees below zero.

Many of the 17, casualties in U. That's how Kavanaugh's visit to the commissary for warm clothing paid off. Had that of U. But it was a different era with a war viewed differently by the American public. He and his wife, Lorayn, have returned to various gatherings of "the few" over the years, including in when they were among about who were invited by the South Korean government to return to ve recognized Korea to be recognized, although of course there was no visit back to the site of the battle.

He and the others, at an event attended by the Marine Corps Commandant as well as South Korean government officials, all received the Korean Marine Corps Service Medal hung from a ribbon carrying a small version of the flag of each country in the U. Now back to Galloway, a UPI reporter decorated for battlefield heroism at the battle of Ia Drang in November of , spent a week doing interviews in Seattle in the spring of , after I urged him to come to Seattle and found KCPQ TV willing to make its studios available for his interviews.

He returned to Seattle for another round of interviews two years later. I've written several columns on Galloway and his role in the 50th Anniversary Commemoration, partly because we were UPI colleagues he in war zones and I as a political writer and later a Pacific Coast executive for the company.

But in a broader sense because of a fascination with his perspectives on the war in articles and speeches, and the import of the battle in the Ia Drang Valley that Galloway and the late Gen. Hal Moore, then a lieutenant colonel in command of the U. Army forces in that battle, made famous in their book and a subsequent movie. A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam" when the two returned to the battlefield years late. In an exchange this week, Galloway told me: "Earlier this year I interviewed a veteran who had suffered a debilitating crippling stroke two weeks before He died two weeks after the interview.

It makes me angry that those who came to hate the war came to hate the warriors who were their sons and daughters. Shabana Khan's rise to national and global prominence as the queen of promoters of the sport of squash has come with a few giant steps while her progress toward recognition in the local community that she has put on the international squash map is happening in small steps.

One of the reasons she has gained high regard from youthful squash players, their coaches and parents are the national College Showcase that she put on last week for nationally ranked students, 16 men and 16 women, aged 15 to 18, playing before coaches of the top schools where squash is a scholarship sport. It was the fourth annual Showcase event. Shabana Khan and Yasmine The fact the young competitors were all from Washington and California while the coaches eyeing prospective scholarship talent were from schools like Amherst, Middlebury, Vasser, George Washington, Bates, and Brown points up the difference in focus on the sport on the East Coast and the West, including the Puget Sound area.

A quest for awareness for youth squash is exemplified by her thus-far unsuccessful effort to convince the City of Bellevue that there should be a park for squash courts so that, as she puts it, "kids of ordinary means can learn to play without having to have their parents be members of a club. Readers of The Harp will recognize that I've written about Khan before.

The reason is because of a conviction that what she is seeking to do for Bellevue and its young people in particular merits far more attention than she is getting. A couple of ificant developments for Khan and her squash initiatives await in the coming months. One brings particular pleasure to the now year-old former national women's squash champion. That's the fact that her world invitational squash tournament in August for top squash talent, six women and six men, will be an event whose sponsors have decided to name the event, the only one of its kind in the country, after her late father.

There are no other squash events in the country like it. Yusuf Khan, who brought the sport of squash to Seattle from his native India a half-century ago and, as one of the world's top squash professionals, proceeded to bring Seattle to the attention of the national and international squash establishments and see two of his daughters become women's national champions, died last October at the age of One is Dave Cutler of Microsoft, universally acclaimed as the key technical brain behind the Microsoft Windows NT and all the subsequent windows versions.

A decade ago he was recognized as a National Medal of Technology and Innovation laureate, perhaps the most prestigious honor in the country for developers of new technology. The other is Robert Harris, founder, and CEO of PMI-Worldwide, a Seattle-based brand, and product-marketing company with offices in seven cities around the world whose corporate philanthropy has only recently begun to be recognized. Sedky has begun her squash pro career after graduating from the University of Pennsylvania where she was women's national squash champion.

The fact that her father is Egyptian works for Amazon and played squash, is an example of the role the growing international diversity of the Puget Sound region can play in bringing squash, among the top sports in many countries, into greater prominence among activities for young people. It's particularly appropriate that the PMI Dave Cutler event will be named this year for Yusuf Khan since it was 20 years ago that he and Shabana teamed to bring to Seattle the first women's world squash championship ever held in the United States.

Khan is adding a fun factor to the invitational event this year in the form of a tech company tournament that she explains will be called the Tech Challenge and will involve 12 teams, with four from Microsoft already committed. And a few weeks after the invitational event, Khan's plan for a new series of western youth squash tournaments called West Coast Squash will debut as a competitive Junior Squash series involving teams from Vancouver, Portland, San Jose, San Francisco, and the Los Angeles area.

She said Orange County, "which has an excellent squash facility," could be added. In the face of an apparent lack of interest, from the Eastside establishment, in what Shabana is doing for the image of the area in the global squash community and the many countries where squash is a top sport. I was struck by the answer that Harris gave me last year when I asked why he was such a strong supporter of Khan. It bears repeating here. In a world beginning to look inward rather than building international alliances and global partnerships, I believe it's increasingly important to support sports that are global in nature and connect people from around the world.

This is the only way humanity, and our planet are going to survive and prosper. Donald Bonker, one of this state's most respected experts on international trade across the past half dozen presidential administrations, suggests that when trade agreements become more about politics than economics, the stability of economies comes to be at risk. In focusing on the current trade crisis with China, Bonker, a former seven-term Democratic congressman from Washington's Third District, suggests that "China has a historical and long-term perspective that is lacking in America.

Donald Bonker "They have a five-year economic plan that enjoys strong support while America has presidential elections every four years, with incoming presidents often reversing the course of their predecessors," he said. Bonker's trade credentials, both those he earned during his 14 years in Congress from to and from his involvements thereafter, have gained him broad respect in this country and abroad for his trade and foreign investment knowledge.

I knew Bonker well when we were both in our early 30s, he as innovative auditor of Clark County, laying the groundwork for an intended but unsuccessful run for secretary of state, and I as a UPI political writer in Olympia. And later, after his first unsuccessful run for the U.

In fact, I have had fun telling friends occasionally that after he left Congress, at one of our meetings, he gave me a photo of us that had been taken at a political fundraiser for Sen. Martin Durkan and that had hung on his wall during his years in Congress. After sharing the story, I then add that the reason it had hung on his wall was because of the other person in the photo, then-Sen. Birch Bayh of Indiana, one of his heroes. Bonker, 82, travels back and forth regularly from his Bainbridge Island home to Washington, D. We hadn't visited for years when I suggested recently that we have lunch so I could learn about his newly published autobiography called Dancing to the Capitol, which begins with what the foreword describes as "a wry take on his brief stint as a dance instructor, which gives the book its title and its spirit.

In fact, our luncheon discussion quickly turned from his autobiography to the issue of trade and politics. Bonker would like to see Democrats turn trade discussions away from the punitive to the progressive, meaning they should focus on building the opportunity for exports that could create jobs rather than be focused on trade barriers in the hope that approach can retain jobs.

During his tenure in Congress, Bonker authored and was a principal sponsor of ificant trade legislation, the Export Trading Company Act and the Export Administration Act. They have ambitious government programs that give their exporters an advantage in this increasingly competitive global economy," Bonker suggested. That is the real problem. It is contrary to their fundamental beliefs, alignment with their business support base. Having reacquired Spiral Genetics, the genome sequencing company she co-founded fresh out of college a decade ago, Adina Mangubat has taken a couple of key steps to pave the way for a fund-raising effort she intends will move the company onto the global stage in the rapidly emerging DNA testing field.

Adina Mangubat To refer to Mangubat as a seasoned and tested CEO at the age of 32 might be a surprising description to those unaware of the path she's taken for the company she launched at age 22, fresh out of the University of Washington. Adina Mangubat But it's an apt description, given her process over the past couple of years. Or maybe more accurately the last couple of months. Two years ago she guided her company into a merger with a Bay Area bioinformatics company, then a few weeks ago did what she describes as an "un-acquisition" that paved the way for putting together a partnership with Microsoft that will dramatically expand Spiral Genetics' impact, internationally as well as nationally.

Closing the Microsoft partnership, the goal for which is to train algorithms to predict which people may be at risk of cardiovascular problems later in life," followed Adina's participation, along with her team, in Silicon Valley's Y Combinator, which she describes as "the one start-up accelerator in the world.

I asked Mangubat to give a layman an understanding of what widespread genome sequencing could bring about. The technology to read all 3 Billion letters of each person's DNA fast at not a lot of cost," she added. Today, less than 1 percent of the function of genetic variations in humans are understood. In reference to the new fundraising, Mangubat said: "The pitch is that we make large scale genomic data mining possible.

There is a unique thing happening in history where we have reached a point of critical mass for sequencing. And now there are 50 countries that are doing large scale sequencing of their populations to optimize their healthcare systems," she said. Existing tools are not built to handle this scale of data. We are making it possible to mine through this data to find the answers we've all been looking for. Spiral Genetics has been working on small projects with four countries but will look to dramatically scale up its genome work with two of those will the additional funds With a father who was a doctor and a mother who ran the business details of the practice, Mangubat was exposed to medicine from her earliest years.

But her degree was in psychology and her exposure to the idea of genome and DNA came from a classmate in the entrepreneurship program at UW, who co-founded the company with Mangubat and remained for a time as a partner with Mangubat in growing the company in its early years, I couldn't help but wonder what kind of challenges she had to overcome in starting a company as complex as Spiral Genetics as a kid just of out college.

Bobby Brett, the long-time owner of the major-junior hockey Spokane chiefs who is heading into the Western Hockey League finals this weekend, is convinced the advent of National Hockey League NHL play in Seattle come will create a family among the Northwest's local hockey teams. Brett, part of professional baseball's best-known band of brothers who bought Spokane's class A short-season professional baseball team, the Indians, in and added the junior hockey team in , says the yet-to-be-named Seattle NHL team "will be the region's team.

Brett uses the easy example of Tyler Johnson, a local Spokane kid when he was drafted by the Chiefs in at the age of Three years later he began a three-year starring role with his hometown team before he was drafted by the Tampa Bay Lightning in Had a Seattle NHL team been around and been the team to draft Johnson and help him move to stardom, he would have been the embodiment of every teen-age hockey hopefuls dream and his fans firm fans of Seattle's NHL team.

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